First Sweden, and now the European Parliament

4/25/2010 11:10:00 PM

Seyfo Center -- The Resolution passed by the Swedish Parliament on 11 March 2010 stating that, during the First World War, Armenians, Assyrians, and the Pontus Greeks were subjected to genocide has been applauded by organisations representing the victims all over the world.

This Resolution contributes to historical justice, and helps to inform the public all over the world of these historical facts. It is an historic step towards the worldwide recognition of the 1915 Genocide. It will also help open the way for Turkey to face up to its past, and apologise to the victims of the 1915 Genocide.

However, some ultra nationalist and fundamentalist Turkish groups which have refused to acknowledge the genocide, organised rallies in Stockholm and elsewhere to protest against the Resolution using racist language.

Those protestors made reference to what the Samers were subjected to by Swedes, Algerians by the French and Native Americans by Americans. Following every resolution to recognise the 1915 Genocide they resort to the same clichéd rhetoric to cover up their shame. They fail to understand that genocide is a crime against humanity and cannot be covered up.

They called for, mainly on internet sites, the boycotting of goods and products made by Swedish companies, including Volvo, IKEA, SAAB, Erikson. They also targeted members of the Swedish Parliament by claiming that they are terrorists, Jews or Armenians. Prime Minister Erdogan went even further and threatened that Armenians who live and work illegally in Turkey, in order to make a living, could be deported. The language used in his speech and in some newspaper articles shows us with what sort of mentality Turkey is being ruled.

This historical resolution by the Swedish parliament is the first step taken for Assyrians. In order to create the environment for the second step, the Seyfo Centre, the Assyrian Democratic Organisation (ADO) and other Assyrian organisations are having a conference at the European Parliament on 28 April 2010.

Speakers at the conference include some members of the European Parliament, and speakers from America, Sweden and Turkey.